Artwork Wednesday: An Apple and its Seeds

Back in 2014 at Advocacy Day in Washington D.C. Maria and Elizabeth developed art packs. These packs were designed to provide an outlet of freedom of expression and healing to those affected by infertility.

Did you receive one of our art packs in D.C. and have an artistic story that you want to share that you haven’t shared with us already? We would love to feature your piece in one of our future #ArtworkWednesday posts.

If you’re unable to complete your project, that’s okay. We understand that creating artwork can be intimidating. However, it’s more about the process of setting aside the time and giving yourself some space for a creative outlet than the results.

Recently Elizabeth Sobkiw-Williams created a piece from one of those art packs. Read her personal story and view her moving artwork below:

Elizabeth Walker's untitled piece from one of the Advocacy Day art packs.

Elizabeth Sobkiw-Williams’ untitled piece from one of the Advocacy Day art packs.

Untitled

Elizabeth Sobkiw-Williams

mixed media – yarn, watercolor

I once had a child ask me why an apple had seeds, and I told her that they could be planted and new apples would grow. In that moment I felt like something in nature had gone wrong with me. I was like an apple with no seeds, an anomaly, an end of the line. There would never be a piece of me that would be a part of the world.

I always look for the unique in nature, something to remind me that I am not alone in my struggle. And beauty can be found in these imperfections.

News Round Up: All About Veterans

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CSPAN announcing HR 2577 passed.

This week’s News Round Up is all about veterans because a historic vote just took place and passed! The Mil-Con Bill, now named HR 2577, passed yesterday in the full United States Senate by a vote of 89 to 8, with Senators Corker, Crapo, Flake, Lankford, Lee, Paul, Risch, and Sessions voting against it and Senators Boxer, Cruz, and Sanders not voting. Confirmed: it *included* the Amendment providing funding for IVF for Veterans. It will now move forward to a conference committee to reconcile the bill and then go back to both the House and Senate for a vote.

Kuddos to all of you who called Congress this past week encouraging your local Senators to support this bill. Citizen advocacy does work!

Today, we localize the importance of this bill by sharing a recent news story of Michelle Wager, a MI veteran who has been facing her own infertility journey.

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Michelle Wager, a MI veteran facing infertility.

“A roadside bomb blew off one of Wager’s legs, badly damaged the other and broke her back. Doctors say she coded three times. Her recovery was long and painful. Military health benefits covered the cost to get Wager back on her feet, but there was another problem. Her menstrual cycles had completely stopped, doctors say her injuries threw her body into early menopause. She was just 31 years old and her chances of having a child were slim to none.”

You can read more of Michelle’s story here.

We invite you to learn more about the challenge veterans face when pursuing family-building options and to contact your federal representatives asking them to co-sponsor S 469, the Women Veterans and Family Health Services Act. Find your representatives here.

 

Myth: Advocacy Day is Over and The Work Is Done

This past Wednesday Elizabeth, myself and several hundreds of other infertility professionals and infertile individuals met with our representatives asking them to support The Veterans Amendment to the Senate Appropriations Mil-Con Bill. This bill would provide funding for the VA to offer IVF to wounded veterans. Currently, the VA does not provide IVF coverage to our Veterans. You can learn more about this injustice hereWe just learned that the Senate will be voting on this issue this week! And so, our #IFAdvocacy work is not over — it is just beginning! Please take time this week to contact your Senators and urge them to support this very important bill! 

Below, we are busting the myth that Advocacy Day is just a one-day event. We provide reflections on Advocacy Day and some strategies to help you encourage those in your infertility support network to continue this important advocacy work all year long.

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Empowering! Exhilarating! Amazing! Awe-Inspiring! 

Elizabeth and Maria at Advocacy Day's Welcome Reception located in the Russell Senate Building.

Elizabeth and Maria at Advocacy Day’s Welcome Reception located in the Russell Senate Building.

These are just a few words that can attempt to capture the overwhelming rush of energy you feel attending an Advocacy Day.

This year though was particularly invigorating given the day’s partnership with veterans and advocating for the VA to change their anti-family-building policies that provide no IVF care to veterans (click here to find out specifics of these policies). Taking on such an issue opened many doors, both on the right and the left, highlighting to staffers, legislative aides and the representatives themselves the injustice these VA policies have on family-building for military families.

At the opening reception, we were powerfully reminded by a military family the importance of advocating for sponsorship of these veterans bills. A military spouse remarked

“War has changed their family, it shouldn’t keep them from having one.”

Upon uttering these words, you could hear the gasps of emotion from the audience. Energy was filling our lungs.

And on Wednesday May 11th, we took that energy and got to work walking the hill as we wore our orange ribbons and #IVF4Vets buttons.Twitter blew up, Facebook pages blew up, even congressional reps and aids seemed a bit surprised.

Nearly 200 infertile advocates took over the hill on May 11th, changing the conversation.

Nearly 200 infertile advocates took over the hill on May 11th, changing the anticipated conversation.

But now, we are all back home. We have returned to our day-to-day, returned to hosting our support groups, returned to our own personal struggles with infertility. The question that we now need to focus on is no longer, how will I get my representatives to support better infertility coverage? We did that. We got their attention. We even made CNN.

tapper

Jake Tapper of CNN covers our Advocacy Day and push to get #IVF4Vets.

The question is now, how can I continue to remind my representatives that #IFAdvocacy is not just a day – it is a movement for social change, a move towards family-building, a move towards reproductive social justice. How do we do this though? How do we bottle up all of that energizing spirit and tap into it on a consistent basis?

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Elizabeth, visiting Rep. Walhberg’s (R-MI) office for the third time to ask him to support #IFAdvocacy.

Think about it as a monthly bill that you have to pay (and doesn’t yet have automatic bill payment setup). Pick a date in your calandar. Perhaps it is the 11th since we met with our reps on the 11th. Give yourself a monthly alert on this date to connect once more with your represenatives. Send out an email, send a tweet. Take those business cards you received and email their aids. On Father’s Day, remind those our representatives of how hard this day can be for those looking to build their families. On Thanksgiving and Christmas, do the same. Be an advocate all year long. This takes work.

We know that it does. But if we want #IFAdvocacy and #IVF4Vets we need to hold ourselves and our representatives accountable. In the words of Rep. Tammy Duckworth, the hill is our house. Let’s be sure to demand to our representatives that infertility coverage is something we are putting in our house.

Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) speaking at the morning training session about her own personal story with infertility while serving in the military.

Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) speaking at the morning training session about her own personal story with infertility while serving in the military.

Let’s Remember Advocacy Day Is Just the Beginning

Empowering! Exhilarating! Amazing! Awe-Inspiring! 

Elizabeth and Maria at Advocacy Day's Welcome Reception located in the Russell Senate Building.

Elizabeth and Maria at Advocacy Day’s Welcome Reception located in the Russell Senate Building.

These are just a few words that can attempt to capture the overwhelming rush of energy you feel attending an Advocacy Day.

This year though was particularly invigorating given the day’s partnership with veterans and advocating for the VA to change their anti-family-building policies that provide no IVF care to veterans (click here to find out specifics of these policies). Taking on such an issue opened many doors, both on the right and the left, highlighting to staffers, legislative aides and the representatives themselves the injustice these VA policies have on family-building for military families.

At the opening reception, we were powerfully reminded by a military family the importance of advocating for sponsorship of these veterans bills. A military spouse remarked

“War has changed their family, it shouldn’t keep them from having one.”

Upon uttering these words, you could hear the gasps of emotion from the audience. Energy was filling our lungs.

And on Wednesday May 11th, we took that energy and got to work walking the hill as we wore our orange ribbons and #IVF4Vets buttons.Twitter blew up, Facebook pages blew up, even congressional reps and aids seemed a bit surprised.

Nearly 200 infertile advocates took over the hill on May 11th, changing the conversation.

Nearly 200 infertile advocates took over the hill on May 11th, changing the anticipated conversation.

But now, we are all back home. We have returned to our day-to-day, returned to hosting our support groups, returned to our own personal struggles with infertility. The question that we now need to focus on is no longer, how will I get my representatives to support better infertility coverage? We did that. We got their attention. We even made CNN.

tapper

Jake Tapper of CNN covers our Advocacy Day and push to get #IVF4Vets.

The question is now, how can I continue to remind my representatives that #IFAdvocacy is not just a day – it is a movement for social change, a move towards family-building, a move towards reproductive social justice. How do we do this though? How do we bottle up all of that energizing spirit and tap into it on a consistent basis?

13230315_10154236330306742_2925500788373099402_n

Elizabeth, visiting Rep. Walhberg’s (R-MI) office for the third time to ask him to support #IFAdvocacy.

Think about it as a monthly bill that you have to pay (and doesn’t yet have automatic bill payment setup). Pick a date in your calandar. Perhaps it is the 11th since we met with our reps on the 11th. Give yourself a monthly alert on this date to connect once more with your represenatives. Send out an email, send a tweet. Take those business cards you received and email their aids. On Father’s Day, remind those our representatives of how hard this day can be for those looking to build their families. On Thanksgiving and Christmas, do the same. Be an advocate all year long. This takes work.

 

 

We know that it does. But if we want #IFAdvocacy and #IVF4Vets we need to hold ourselves and our representatives accountable. In the words of Rep. Tammy Duckworth, the hill is our house. Let’s be sure to demand to our representatives that infertility coverage is something we are putting in our house.

Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) speaking at the morning training session about her own personal story with infertility while serving in the military.

Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) speaking at the morning training session about her own personal story with infertility while serving in the military.

Last Call for Interviews in D.C. Next Week

A week from now, Advocacy Day will be over. However, your story can be shared to promote #IFadvocacy throughout the year and beyond, by recording an interview for our oral history project. Maria and I are scheduling mini interviews on Tuesday May 10 and Wednesday May 11 and would love to hear about your infertility journey.

ART-of-Infertility-ArtifactThe interviews will be short, about 30 minutes in length including a quick photo session, and we invite you to bring along an object that helps you tell your story. Maybe it’s a photo of the embryo that became your child, the journal you kept, a necklace you bought to remember a baby you lost, or a bill from your clinic. You can read a bit about our sessions at Advocacy Day last year at this link.

If you’d like to share your story with us, please fill out the Google Form found here. After today, we’ll be looking at all of the responses we receive and will contact you with your interview time slots. Due to the tight schedule, it’s likely we won’t be able to talk to everyone while we’re in D.C., but will work with you to record your story at a later time if we can’t meet up next week.  We hope to hear from you and look forward to seeing you in D.C.!

Elizabeth

Share Your Story with the ART of Infertility in Washington D.C.

In exactly one week, we will be in the Washington, D.C. area for RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association’s Advocacy Day. For those in the area or those who are traveling to D.C. for Advocacy Day, we invite you to consider participating in the ART of Infertility project. This project will be traveling around the U.S. this year sharing your inspirational infertility stories at a variety of venues and events — some directly related to the topic of infertility and some interested in storytelling from a broader vantage.

Renee, Annie, Elizabeth, Maria, and Jo at the wrap up reception during Advocacy Day.

Renee, Annie, Elizabeth, Maria, and Jo at the wrap up reception during Advocacy Day in May 2015.

These interviews in D.C. will be brief — 30 minutes at the most. And we invite you to bring an object that helps you talk about a part of your story. In the past, these objects have ranged from a tattoo, to a quilt to even a poem. We invite all objects and all stories. You can read and hear snapshots of interviews from last year’s event, here.

If you are interested and would like to participate, we ask that you fill out this brief Google form. We look forward to meeting new and old faces in D.C.!

 

Myth – Infertility awareness is only important for one week in April.

Last week was a big week for us, it was National Infertility Awareness Week. We believe in raising awareness about infertility year round and one of the biggest days of the year is right around the corner. What is it? Advocacy Day. It’s a day when those in the infertility community, and their friends and family, descend on Washington, D.C. and have meetings with their legislators, encouraging them to support the bills that will improve the lives of those with infertility by helping them build their families. If you’ve never done anything like that before, it might sound a bit scary. I’ll admit I was a bit nervous the first year I attended. However, that nervousness was quickly replaced with a feeling of strength and empowerment I hadn’t before felt in my infertility journey.

Maria and I attended our first Advocacy Day in 2014. It's where we met! Here we are with Maria's husband, Kevin Jordan, and one of my best friends, Sarah Powell.

Maria and I attended our first Advocacy Day in 2014. It’s where we met! Here we are with Maria’s husband, Kevin Jordan, and one of my best friends, Sarah Powell.

Advocacy Day is on May 11th this year. The deadline for registration is this Wednesday, May 4th. Have ever felt discouraged by the out of pocket expenses you’ve incurred due to your disease? Ever wished that there was more research being done about conditions like Endometriosis or PCOS that can contribute to infertility? Have you wished that there was more support for potential adoptive families? Have you thought it’s an outrage that there is a ban on IVF for veterans? If so, this is an opportunity for you to tell law makers how you feel and be a part of changing things for the better. Maria and I will be there, along with many of the individuals you’ve read stories about here. Candace Wohl, Judy Horn, Lindsey, Jennifer, Katie Lelito, Cindy Flynn, Brooke Kingston, Risa Levine, Angela Bergmann, and more. If any of these people’s stories inspired you, here’s a chance to meet them in person! I will happily introduce you!

Need more inspiration? Check out the videos below!

Please, meet us at Advocacy Day!

Elizabeth

 

 

 

Myth: You’re Alone in Your Infertility Journey

When I was first diagnosed with infertility, I felt like I was living on my own deserted island. It wasn’t that I didn’t want to tell people about how overwhelmed, sad, and lost that I was feeling. It was that I didn’t know who I could tell that would understand. I remember telling one of my good friends to which they responded, “Oh, don’t worry Maria. It will happen, you guys are young. You just have to give it time.”

I remember thinking, “No, you don’t understand. You don’t know how difficult it is for me to even get out of bed in the morning. You don’t know how upset I get when I see a pregnant woman pushing a cart in the grocery store. You don’t know how angry I get when I see a family taking a walk around my block. You just don’t know how deeply these little, everyday activities can trigger feelings of intense sadness.”

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Maria, with her husband Kevin, who have now lived most of their 5-year marriage with infertility.

For a while I didn’t think I would meet anyone who would understand how I was feeling. And so I started to isolate myself – from my family, friends, even partially from my husband. I felt that I didn’t have anything to worthy to contribute to conversations or events, so I just removed myself from them.

My feelings of wanting isolation, however, began to change when I made the decision to attend RESOLVE’s Advocacy Day in 2014. Tired of living on this so called “infertile desert island,” I convinced my husband to make the drive from Grand Rapids, MI to Washington, D.C. to maybe start doing something about my frustration and isolation rather than just complain about how I was feeling.

How one decision can change your life. Seriously.

While at Advocacy Day I began to feel like I was taking action to not just change my life but the life of thousands of other infertile men and women silently suffering with the disease, the most impactful takeaway were the friendships that I formed. Particularly, my friendship with Elizabeth Walker.

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Maria and Elizabeth in San Francisco, CA in July 2015 for the ART of Infertility.

For Elizabeth and me May 2014 was our first Advocacy Day. Both of us were representing the state of MI and so we spent most of the day together walking the halls of Congress handing out letters and asking our representatives to sponsor infertility related bills. Perhaps it was the experience of doing something totally out of your everyday that helped form such a strong bond. Or perhaps it was simply a friendship that was suppose to be. But whatever it was – Elizabeth and I both knew that we found another person who we could confide in and who simply got one another.

Since Advocacy Day in 2014, Elizabeth and I have worked together on the ART of Infertility. Traveling to numerous states, hosting art and writing workshops, dropping in at prominent fertility clinics to talk about the project, talking about infertility at academic conferences, and even mentoring young college interns about infertility. We are busy but being busy has also saved me – made me feel like I am being productive, no longer wallowing away on my infertility island.

I often think what my life would be like if I never met Elizabeth. Thinking about this, I get lost and overwhelmed. Our friendship has been integral to my healing, to my strength and to my commitment to always advocate on the behalf of those who are infertile. She has become not just my infertile sister, she’s simply Liz – my big sis.

And so while there are a million different reasons to consider attending Advocacy Day this year on May 11th, one of the most powerful reasons to attend is because it could quite literally change your life through the friendships you may form. If I never met Elizabeth that May 2014 during Advocacy Day, my life would not be what it is today. So, I encourage you all – if you are feeling alone, in despair, frustrated and ready to make a change – come to Advocacy Day where you will be greeted by hundreds of other infertile women and men who understand exactly how you are feeling. You will be amazed.

Advocacy Day isn’t just about coming together to advocate for infertility rights, it is also about coming together as a group that has been told their stories shouldn’t be told, their stories don’t count enough to be considered for legislative action. It is a coming together as a force of women and men who have become friends from across the U.S. to change how we think, talk, and support issues of infertility. Advocacy Day is powerful as it is a pure embodied display of how the coming together of friendships can make change.

Join us!

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Maria and Elizabeth outside the Capital Building during Advocacy Day 2015.

Reflections on Advocacy Day from Infertility Professional, and Patient, Lindsey

Bringing you another personal story by way of my interviews in Columbus a few weeks ago. Lindsey, who is both an infertility patient, and a health care professional in the field, shares why advocacy is important to her. Thanks, Lindsey, for sharing your story!

Elizabeth

“I practice as an OB/GYN Nurse Practitioner and specialize in infertility. I was an RN and worked in the cardiac ICU and then case management so nothing women’s health related. Then, my husband and I got married and started trying to get pregnant. We had a lot of trouble. I felt like the nurses and other people I encountered along the way as a patient had a complete lack of knowledge of what to do with me. It’s a specialty field so I feel like it’s not necessarily the nurses’ fault. I just think, in general, it’s an area that people don’t know anything about unless they work in it. Physicians don’t necessarily do as much or know as much as they should before you end up getting to a specialist. I feel like there’s a lot of wasted time. I decided to go to grad school so I could help other people.”

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Lindsey at work in her Columbus, Ohio OB/GYN office.

“I want to share my story because infertility is just not talked about enough. People don’t know enough about it, or realize that it impacts so many people. It won’t be such a taboo topic if it’s something that people are actually aware of. It’s been so hushed and so unspoken that people don’t know enough about it to care enough about it.”

“The first year I went to Advocacy Day, RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association, really wanted to get professionals there because they think that the senators and representatives take well to professionals who see infertility on large scales. I find it extremely frustrating that legislators, and people in general, don’t fight for coverage for IVF and insurance for those with infertility. Working in the field, we pay for type 2 diabetes in people who have poor lifestyle choices, we pay for lung cancer in people who have smoked. We cover all of these diseases that are, not always but many times, preventable. Infertility typically is not, yet there’s no coverage for it. It’s such a disparity in medicine that we don’t treat a disease like infertility. That’s something I push at Advocacy Day. We cover preventable disease, we cover self inflicted disease, and we don’t cover this.”

“If people are nervous about going to Advocacy Day, I think that once they go, they’ll want to go back because it’s empowering. They’ll feel like they’re making a difference then they won’t question it again.”

– Lindsey

Please consider joining ART of IF and Lindsey in Washington, D.C. for Advocacy Day on May 11th. 

 

 

 

 

Advocacy Day Reflections from Jennifer

A few weeks ago I decide to take a last minute trip to Columbus, OH. While there, I was able to interview Jennifer. Jennifer was diagnosed with PCOS and Endometriosis and dealt with years of infertility before a successful IUI and the birth of her daughter, Kathryn. For the past few years, Jennifer and her husband have been trying IUIs again. Below, Jennifer reflects on Advocacy Day and why she makes the trip to Washington, D.C. each year. Thanks, Jennifer, for sharing your story.

Elizabeth

“At first I went because three of my friends were going. I was like, oh, it’s going to be a fun girls trip. I think sometimes I’m a fairly cynical person so I don’t necessarily always think that our voice is heard and that the senator really cares, but going in there and telling them what we need, what we want, and that there is a need for infertility coverage and the adoption credit, I felt so empowered. In control almost. Like I could take back control and I didn’t expect to feel that. It was a lot more emotional than I thought it would be. I think I probably did cry at some point on that day and I didn’t expect that at all. I really didn’t. I’m always sort of using humor as my natural defense and sort of hide stuff so I was really shocked by how emotional I was that first Advocacy Day.”

Jennifer-infertility-advocacy

“One of the things that I came away with the first time I went to Advocacy Day that never even entered my mind was that if, in twenty years, my daughter is infertile for whatever reason, whether it’s her, or her spouse, or whatever, that I could do this for her. It hit me like a ton of bricks. I could fight for her so that she never has to know this pain. So that’s why I keep doing it. More than for myself or for anything.”

“I thought I was going to make a difference for myself. That I was doing it because of my journey and what I went through. I just started thinking about Kathryn and if anything I do on that day can make it easier for her, if she HAS to walk this path, then I’ll go every year, every day, forever.”